Crunchy On The Outside

Earlier this week, I mentioned that in the days leading up to and including La Festa di Santa Lucia, Palermitani don’t eat flour-based foods. So what do they eat then? Arancine, of course! Yes, these balls-of-gold are a masterpiece of Palermitano wheat-free street food, and Sicilians of the Conco d’Oro take their arancine very seriously…

Rice Balls Made in Brooklyn

Tonight I made balls! I am full of goodies and joy after spending the evening in Brooklyn with Paige Lipari (right) at her Sicilian-inspired bookstore and cafè, Archestratus Books & Food. We made Palermo-style arancine (fried rice balls) from scratch, getting our hands full of sticky rice, breadcrumbs, and various fillings, including traditional ragu with…

The Arancina of My Eye

Let’s talk about the lighter side of the traditions for the Festa di Santa Lucia: Arancine! Yes, this ball of gold is a masterpiece of Palermitano wheat-free street food, and Sicilians of the Conco d’Oro take their arancine very seriously on Saint Lucy’s feast day. The fried rice balls stuffed with beef ragu, peas, and…

Catania’s Rice Balls

I’ve told you about the Palermo-style arancina–a breaded and fried rice ball with a center of peas, caciocavallo cheese, and beef ragu that looks like an orange. Important to note: the end of the word is an A. ArancinA. Well, in Catania, on the east side of Sicily, they have a similar recipe, but with…

Arancina di Spinaci

Arancine have been gaining popularity outside of Sicily in recent years. But let’s be clear: they are from Sicily. Also, understand that they are “arancine” or one is an “arancina.” You’ll find in restaurants in the US they are often mis-named “arancini.” Arancini (plural with an -i) are little oranges (“Arancio,” with an -o, is…