Getting Into the Details

The olive harvest is in full swing right now. Making olive oil is as complex as making wine, and on Day 7 of our June 2018 multi-generational tour, Ancient Italy: A Cultural Journey Through Campania and Sicily, we’ll get into the details at an organic olive farm in Castelvetrano. This Wednesday evening from 7:30 to…

Emeralds or Olives

Who needs emeralds when you can have Nocellara del Belice olives? On Day 3 of Savoring Sicily (our Sept. 22 – Oct. 4, small-group tour), we’ll have lunch at this working olive farm, where you’ll be surrounded by the Centonze family jewels. But, not only lunch. We’ll also have the benefit of the owner taking…

Hand Picked

Olives are ready to be harvested in October and November. In early October, farmers pick them for eating. Now, at the end of October and into November, they pick them to make olive oil. These beautiful Nocellara del Belice variety of olives from Castelvetrano are picked by hand in order to best preserve the integrity…

Cast the nets!

The olive harvest is on! What we learned on our tour is that there are two phases of the olive harvest: the first round is for olives that are to be eaten; the second round, which takes place generally in late October/early November (depends on the climate-location of the trees), is for producing oil.

Sicily’s Liquid Gold

Olive trees and olive oil where brought to Sicily by the Greeks and the Phoenicians in the centuries before the Common Era. Today, the island region is one of Italy’s most prolific producers of this liquid gold that has many health benefits and uses–from cooking to soap to moisturizer. Feudotto, imported in the US by…

Olive You

November marks the olive harvest in Sicily, and the 38th annual Sagra dell’Ulivo (Olive Festival) in Pollina is currently underway. This weekend in the town that is not far from Cefalù on the edge of the Madonie Mountains, they are presenting cultural events including folk music, art exhibitions, and of course, olive- and olive-oil inspired…

Caciocavallo Cheese

Many Sicilian recipes call for Caciocavallo cheese. Caciocavallo is a Southern Italian cow’s milk cheese that could be compared to Provolone (a similar, Northern Italian cheese), but depending on how long it has aged and the types of grass the cows ate before being milked, it could have a spicier and saltier flavor. It’s named…