Burgio, Another of Sicily’s Ceramic Centers

Burgio is one of Sicily’s ceramic centers, where for centuries different family studios created distinct pottery. Different from Santo Stefano di Camastra, Caltagirone, and Sciacca, Burgio’s designs are depicted on a tan-colored bed versus white. During our Secret Sicily tour earlier this month, on our excursion led by Val di Kam, we visited Arcuri Ceramics,…

Voilà, It’s Majolica! 

Santo Stefano di Camastra is one of Sicily’s ceramics centers. There is an entire street of the town lined with ceramics shops that are filled with majolica ceramics (maiolica in Italian). Majolica describes a technique of decorating earthenware (ceramics made with red clay, AKA bisque or biscuit) that has been fired at a relatively low…

One with the Tiles

Here I am, one with the tiles of Caltagirone’s Staircase of Santa Maria del Monte, which was built in 1609 to connect the old lower town to the new upper town. Since 1954, each of its 142 steps was decorated with a unique design of colorful, handcrafted majolica ceramic tile, a craft for which the…

A Genius Feat 

If you are into art, architecture, and ceramics, Le Stanze al Genio (The Rooms to the Genius) is for you. This home-museum features a collection of majolica ceramic floor tiles sporting designs from Naples and Sicily that were produced from the end of the 16th century to the beginning of the 20th century. You must…

Sicily’s Red Ceramics

These ceramic tiles, which are painted in the classic style of artisans from Santo Stefano di Camastra, were purchased by my friend Jodi during our time together in Sicily in May. She plans to put them over her kitchen stove. Imagine having a piece of Sicily to look at each time you stir your sauce?

Absolutely Genius 

For something extraordinary and off-the-beaten path, I recommend a visit to Le Stanze al Genio (The Rooms to the Genius), a collection of majolica ceramic floor tiles focused on designs from Naples and Sicily that were produced from the end of the 16th century to the beginning of the 20th century. Housed in the 17th-century…

Salt to Taste 

I love when art and utility meet. Here’s my salt holder, which is over my stove in New York City, made by Palermo ceramica artist, Nino Parrucca. Of course, it’s filled with sea salt from Trapani! Just lift the door, and salt to taste.